The Musings Of An Opinionated Sod [Help Me Grow!]


Sometimes, Amazing Hides Itself.
January 17, 2013, 6:20 am
Filed under: Comment

It’s an oldie.

It’s another of my beloved triumph-over-adversity things.

But it’s also a reminder we should not make judgements until we’ve seen action.

Too many people – especially in adland – define someone’s abilities or talent by the company they keeps or work at.

That is both bollocks and dangerous, because success should not just be judged by accolades or accomplishments, but also attitude and actions.

I’m sure the reason why so many are so quick to judge others is to protect their sensitive egos or delusions – and while some folks expectations border on fantasy – they’re many out there who could be amazing if given the right chance in the right circumstances.

While I would never, ever, ever claim to be amazing – except in my ability to buy complete and utter tosh – I am definitely someone who prospered because some people, foolishly, believed in me which is why I’ll always prefer to work with people who have lived a life rather than an [advertising] lifestyle and why I’ll always recommend you put emphasis on the person you report to rather than the name of the agency who pays your salary.


32 Comments so far
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Is this the backstory of the Nike “greatness” campaign, another love letter to triumph over adversity again or classic Rob sentimentalism?

Comment by DH

Or all 3 combined?

Comment by DH

Hope yesterday was OK for you and yor Mum. Any news on the big man? I tried calling but it was off.

Comment by DH

I have David if you would like to call me.

Comment by George

Why didn’t I see that before. The greatness campaign has Rob written all over it. Triumph over adversity. Attitude over accolades. Inclusivity over exclusivity. It’s like all of Rob’s favourite film storylines rolled into one. Hillarious. Good work Dave.

Comment by Pete

OK, the video got me. And his old man is pretty cool as wellz. Damn you Rob.

Comment by DH

* well

Comment by DH

I don’t want to sound harsh because the boy in the video is delightful but do you think the happiness bestowed on him is because people are genuinely happy for his achievement or a byproduct of guilt, because they had previously made an instant and negative judgement on his capabilities? The “Susan Boyle” effect I’m pretty sure you once talked about.

Of course this all feeds into your post and the need to stop making immediate judgement before exploring potential and possibilities but I’m just interested to hear what you think.

Hope you’re good after the emotion of yesterday.

Comment by Pete

Racist. Or something.

Comment by Billy Whizz

It all happened six years ago and there were longer videos that showed he was popular at school before that fateful game. And he’s doing pretty well today judging by Wikipedia.

Comment by .John

Why you’re putting a “.” before your name? Will you be removing a letter every month until you just have the dot. Will this be your version of Prince’s squiggle? Got to tell you John, it needs work.

Comment by DH

So do I.

Comment by John

I know why you’re saying that Pete and it’s a fair point.

Maybe some people are doing it from a position of guilt – but in the case of the guy in the video, I get the impression that people were genuinely pleased for seeing him do so well because they knew how passionate he was about the game & team, even before he had a chance to get on the court.

Maybe it’s simply a case that for those who know the people well, it’s pride and happiness whereas for others, there’s the potential of guilt playing a part in their response.

Maybe.

Comment by Rob

It’s definitely a good point. I hope (in the UK at least) the effect of the incredible Paralympic games, and the backing it had throughout the country is a sign that this kind of support will be based upon a person’s determination, and battle against adversity rather than any lingering guilt.

Comment by Rob Mortimer

What we all want to know is if he got some after the game.

Comment by Billy Whizz

Possibly more than you could ever dream, Billy.

Comment by Rob

He’d be happy with 1.

Comment by DH

Jealous.

Comment by Billy Whizz

My takeaway from this post is that it’s all the fault of the people I reported to. Is tha right?

Comment by .John

Brilliant.

Comment by DH

Everything I haven’t achieved is everybody else’s fault. I buy into that.

Comment by Billy Whizz

That is so not what I meant and you all know that …

I don’t know if you’re all mini Norman Tebbit’s or some terrible early-round performer on American Idol.

Seriously, maybe we should reopen cynic, it appears we would have a wealth of qualified people to work with.

Comment by Rob

Sorry they were just following orders

Comment by northern

It’s all down to luck, starting with luck of birth. And anyone who responds to that by saying you make your own luck doesn’t understand the concept

Comment by John

Your last paragraph is valuable advice. Both to employees and employers. The video is lovely as well. Hope all is good Robert.

Comment by George

Jonny Horby apparently said the secret to success was to surround yourself with talented people, but, debate on the video aside, I totally believe that it’s also about someone willing to give you a chance
My Dad was a complete waste of space academically, no O-levels, failed a trial for Leeds, but was lucky enough to get an apprenticeship and learn on the job, got some formal qualications at nightschool and then someone spotted he might have been managament material and put him on the management programme.
Imagine what would have happened to him if this was today (apart from getting the Leeds gig since my Mum is probably good enough to play for them right now)

Comment by northern

Is that because we beat you 7-3 and 4-1 in the last 12 months?

That aside, I agree with you. Of course being surrounded by clever people is awesome but the point I think we’re both making, is that “clever” could be someone who hasn’t got any of the formal – or usual – traits, but the way companies (& society for that matter) dismisses those sorts before they have even been given a chance to impress (or be developed) means opportunities could be being missed every day simply because the people with the different perspectives, ideas & approaches are being filtered out.

Comment by Rob

You had to turn the knife didn’t you

Comment by northern

You’re going to get your own back. I’m talking to you-know-who tonight.

Comment by Rob

Excellent, I trust you are familiar with the entire back catalogue
And the relevance of the works of Oscar Wilde

Comment by northern

I hear the distant sound of humble pie being swallowed. Or it may well be hell freezing over.

Comment by George

Thunderbolts of lightning very, very frightening him……

Comment by northern




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