The Musings Of An Opinionated Sod [Help Me Grow!]


The Law Might Be An Ass, But It’s Better Than Being An Asshole …

I grew up in a family of lawyers.

Ethics.

Criminal law.

From defending Ozzy Osbourne to prosecuting members of the mafia, my childhood was surrounded by legal cases.

As the years passed, my father got a bit despondent about law.

He always felt it was about a quest for truth and justice – regardless of personal situation or circumstance – but saw how it was quickly becoming about cash.

Instead of solving issues, law firms seemed to be focused on keeping the problems alive as that ensured their high fees kept flowing in.

This might explain why there are now more lawyers than Police officers in NYC.

It’s a highly profitable business.

That said, I always loved the law and considered a career in it … until I realised I didn’t have the patience – or brains – to succeed.

Getting 2% in a maths exam pretty much confirmed that to me.

However, my upbringing had a huge effect on me in terms of right and wrong and that’s why the situation I’m seeing happening in adland in conflicting me.

On one hand I’m incredibly happy the predators are being identified, outed and held to task.

But I’m also conscious the way some companies/people/organisations are approaching the situation seems to be with one eye on how they look to the broader audience than being caring and compassionate to the victims who have been subjected to the abuse for so long.

It also bothers me when responsibility seems to stop at the abuser, not the people who enabled that abuse to continue.

Sure, sometimes the senior figures may have been in the dark, but it appears that is more the exception than the rule.

Look, if a company tells someone to leave, there’s obviously a reason for it.

But I must admit I’m finding it rather strange to see how some companies are publicly announcing they’ve let someone go – and specifically naming the individual – but using some ambiguous wording as to the reason why.

Maybe they are trying to offer some final professional respect to the person they’ve just let go, but if that’s the case, why name them at all given they must know the industry will automatically assume it was for some sort of sexual misconduct.

Don’t get me wrong, I am not suggesting we should feel sorry for anyone that has been dismissed for proven, serious wrong-doing, but I do think we need to ensure this situation is handled openly and transparently rather than trying to get some sort of popularity out of it.

And that’s why I’m conflicted, because criminal law is based on 2 principals.

The accuser is presumed to be telling the truth.

The accused is presumed to be innocent.

That’s why it’s so important to not taint the evidence – to ensure each element is given their own space and time to be explored – and while that fragile balance can, and has, been susceptible to manipulation and wrong-doing, it’s important it’s maintained so the victims can be helped and the wrongdoers can be held-to-task accordingly and appropriately.

As I said, I’m so happy to see the wave of change that is sweeping through society and giving a voice to those who have previously been silenced, but I do worry about some of the tactics being embraced by certain organisations because, ironically, they could give the guilty more ability to claim unfair treatment than they ever deserve and potentially get them out of properly paying for their misdeeds.

It’s why I love the #TimesUp movement as it’s designed to give financial and legal equality in the quest for truth.

By removing the advantage many have used to hide their crimes, we have a chance for lasting change. It’s not perfect but it’s better than throwing stones, even if you believe they are justified.

I think my Dad – and family – would be happy to see this.

Hell, they’d probably be passionately behind it.

I know I am.

Advertisements

14 Comments so far
Leave a comment

Your father would be very proud.

Comment by Lee Hill

Good post Robert. I agree with you wholeheartedly. Glad justice is being served on those who have abused their position of power but unnerved by the way some companies and individuals are handling the process. At the end of the day, I’m OK with it because the alternative is a continuation of abuse.

Comment by George

congratulations auntie, something i finally agree with you on. wonders will never fucking cease.

Comment by andy@cynic

I hear you. I also accept by putting it ‘out there’, it can’t be so easily swept under the carpet … but it shouldn’t have to be a choice of one approach of the other. Maybe I’m being naive, but this is people’s lives we’re talking about – whether the victim or the accused – and I feel that needs dealing with a focus on the situation, not any self-publicity for parties either complicit with the situation or endeavoring to exploit it for personal gain.

I know you will agree with this too, but it’s just a really important issue that I feel could be undermined by a lack of commitment to the process of law.

God, I’d love to hear what my Dad had to say about this, haha.

Comment by Rob

I do agree with you. I’m just stating that if the alternative to companies/individuals attempting to prosper from this situation is to let the abuse continue, then it is a price worth paying. Their actions are more obvious than they wish to admit.

Comment by George

billy. dont say a fucking word.

Comment by andy@cynic

the only thing scarier than campbell as a lawyer is campbell as an accountant.

Comment by andy@cynic

or financial advisor, fashion designer or anything connecting to taste and fucking restraint.

Comment by andy@cynic

Sadly I agree,

Comment by Rob

I bet those agencies still win a ton of industry awards and accolades, so has anything really changed in the culture?

Comment by John

The industry has responded by creating female focused awards which I feel adds to the division rather than pushing to solve it.

Comment by Pete

That’s unbelievable.

Comment by John

“It also bothers me when responsibility seems to stop at the abuser, not the people who enabled that abuse to continue.” <- YES.

Comment by Pete

Yes Robert. This is too important to let ego get in the way.

Comment by Mary Bryant




Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s



%d bloggers like this: