The Musings Of An Opinionated Sod [Help Me Grow!]


Is Rice A Weapon Of Mass Destruction?
August 10, 2020, 7:30 am
Filed under: A Bit Of Inspiration, Attitude & Aptitude, China, Comment, Culture, Daily Mail, Food, Health

The picture above is from a headline in the Daily Mail.

I can tell you this …

Throughout my seven years living in China, I can’t tell you many times I heard people had died of heart attacks brought on by ‘arsenic poisoning through too much rice consumption’.

Oh, hang on, yes I can … it was absolutely zero.

Seems the Daily Mail are back to their scare tactic bullshit best, especially as the whole piece sounds like it could have been lifted straight from the fake research website I set up years ago about Asian culture.

We wrote some bollocks about rice there too.



The Last Month Of 4.0 …

So today is June 1.

In 11 days, I wave goodbye to my forties and enter a decade that seems impossible for me to fathom.

50.

FIFTY.

Seriously, how did this happen?

I still remember sitting on the hill outside Erica’s newsagent with my best mate Paul around 1978, when we worked out that in the year 2000, we would be turning 30.

But here we are, 11 days from 50.

[Though it’s 15 days for Paul, who will LOVE those 4 days where he can bang on about how he is a decade younger than me … though he will also moan that my present for him isn’t like the full page newspaper ad I got him when he was 40, but a Forest shirt signed by all the members of the 1980 European Cup team. Asshole. He knows about this present as I bought it for him years ago so I’m not ruining anything for him. But I still have a surprise for him. Oh yes.]

Turning 30 bothered me a bit.

I was totally fine with becoming 40.

But 50!

I’m both bricking it and utterly casual about it.

And while there are some practical reasons for the shitting myself part – health, work, life in general – the fact of the matter is the older I get, the better my life has become.

I totally get the privilege of that statement, I don’t take it for granted at all, but it is definitely true.

Personally, professionally, emotionally …

Sure there have been some bumps along the way – some terribly hard and emotionally destructive ones – but looking at the big picture, the reality is my life has generally been on an upward trajectory.

Now even I know that it can’t keep going like that forever … but it doesn’t mean I have to stop trying.

The fact is, the older you get, the more you discover …

From what you like, what you don’t … to what you didn’t know and what you want to know.

And what makes it even more amazing – and annoying – is that every step you take, in whatever direction, reveals a whole host of other possibilities you would like to explore and investigate.

The problem is time is now officially, not on your side … so there’s a point where you have to accept you won’t get to try, play, experiment with all you want to do, so while that might put some people off, it kind of makes me want to try and pack more in.

And I am … because on top of work, Metallica, the school with Martin, I’ve already agreed to do a couple more projects that are intriguing and – frankly – ridiculous.

But there’s another reason for this attitude and it’s because my Dad died at 60.

Death is something I’ve talked a lot about over the years – mainly due to both my parents passing away.

I’ve talked a lot about the importance of taking about it, but I must admit, I’m scared of it.

I’m in generally good health, but fifty is still 50 and my Dad still died just 10 years on from this age.

Now of course it doesn’t mean I will … and I’ve come to this completely unscientific view that I should live till I’m at least 71 because if you take away my Dad’s age of dying [60]from my Mum’s [83] … that leave 23 years. Halve that … add it to Dad’s age … and voila, I will live till at least 71.

But then that means I only have 21 years left.

TWENTY ONE.

That’s nowhere near enough.

My wonderful little boy is only 5 for fucks sake. 26 is way too young to lose your Dad … hell, that’s even younger than I was when I lost mine.

Years ago, an old boss I looked upto said that if you can’t feasibly double your age, that is when you know you are – at best – middle aged or – at worst – the last stage of your life.

Well I suppose I can still feasibly double my age – even if it’s against the average age of death for a man in the UK [79.2] – but the reality is where I’m going is shorter than where I’ve been.

But shorter doesn’t mean less interesting.

And arguably, I have more exciting things in my life now – both personally and professionally – than I have ever had.

It also helps I am insanely immature with a desire for mischief, experimentation, creativity and adventure.

And I intend to fill it up with even more.

Fortunately I get that from a number of sources.

My wife.

My son.

My job.

My other jobs.

My friends.

My mind.

A while back, Pete said something I found pretty profound.

He said the narrative of strategy tended to focus on the importance of curiosity when discovery is far more valuable for driving the standard of the work you create and the adventure you go on.

Now I’ve written a lot about how I hate when planners talk about curiosity – as if they’re the only people who have it – but I really, really like that idea of the hunger for discovery.

I absolutely have that.

I owe so much of what I have to that.

The countries I’ve lived in. The people I’ve worked with. And most importantly, the family I am fortunate to have.

So while I enter a new decade, I will continue to live like it’s the old one.

Not in terms of dressing like I’m younger than I am – mainly because I have always dressed like I live in 1986 – but with the hunger, ambition and desire I’ve always had.

I genuinely believe my best work is still ahead of me.

Truly believe that.

And the goal of this decade is to achieve some of that while discovering new things that make me believe even better work can still lie in my future.



Rainbows Make Everything Better …

When Corona happened and we were all asked to stay at home, the first thing I thought about was the impact it would have on Otis.

It was bad enough he wouldn’t be seeing his friends for god knows how long, so the last thing I wanted was for him to start thinking the outside and people in general were dangerous.

All this led to an idea about creating a storybook to help kids understand the situation … help parents talk about it in a way that wouldn’t be scary and maybe let everyone ask questions or talk about things without freaking each other out.

A small team, predominantly Ed, James, Igor, David, Dre, Becs and Anna came up with the story, the design, the visuals and the animation – while all in individual quarantine – and 10 days later, From My Window was born.

To be honest the inspiration for all this came from the way Sesame Street handled the death of Mr Hooper – one of the human lead characters.

When he died the producers didn’t know what to do.

Do they recast the role? Do they explain his departure as the character moving away? Do they say he quit or just retired?

Instead the writers and producers decided to create an episode that taught their young audience about the difficult topic of death – not just because they felt that was the best way to respect the character, but because they assumed many kids in their audience may have experienced a loss of a loved one and this could help them better understand what it means and find some inner peace.

The episode was written by the shows head writer and aired on Thanksgiving, 1983. Even now it is regarded as having set the standard for dealing with difficult topics on children’s television and remains the highest rated episode in the shows history.

You can read more about it here: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mr._Hooper

While ‘From My Window’ obviously is not Sesame Street, we hope it can help kids maintain their love for the outside and help parents deal with a situation they never could have imagined would ever happen to them.

From My Window is available for parents to read with their kids [on a smart phone or tablet] at www.frommywindow.rga.com and includes a colouring-in book. The animated version – like the one below – is also available to enjoy here.

I have to say the animated one – below – is my favourite because all the voices are from kids of parents from R/GA London.

And yes, Otis is in it … he makes his debut at the end, when he takes the story on from the beautiful rainbow … which is appropriate because he drew the one at the top of this post.

I’ve got to be honest, I love we did this. I hope in its own small way, it helps. We know it won’t change the world but it may help your kid to keep looking out the window and see wonder and excitement.

No posts till Tuesday because of the Easter holidays. Enjoy the break. Stay safe.

www.frommywindow.rga.com



How Not To Stop A Virus …


Corona virus is pretty bad.

We have seen pretty bad viruses before – hell, I got most of them – but this one has the World genuinely concerned.

Conferences cancelled.

The cruise liner industry destroyed.

Business’ everywhere dramatically affected.

Billions wiped off the stock market.

And while you can argue that governments haven’t really handled the situation as well as they could, the reality is they’ve also handled it a lot better than expected.

Especially China … who definitely learnt from their terrible handling of SARS.

What’s interesting is companies have also got on board with their responsibility.

Encouraging people to work from home.

Putting people in self-managed quarantine if they’ve been to a country with an outbreak.

Everyone seems to be taking this seriously … though sadly, not everyone is quite grasping how to do it well.

Case in point.

I walked into a clients building recently and was immediately handed a piece of paper by a building security guard about how to minimise passing/getting coronavirus … which, ironically, may literally be one of the worst ways to avoid passing/getting coronavirus.

I know they say it’s the thought that counts, but they could do with a bit more thinking.



Moronic Monday …
February 24, 2020, 6:15 am
Filed under: A Bit Of Inspiration, Attitude & Aptitude, Comment, Health, Jill

I’m at that age where you think every pain is terminal cancer.

Cracked nail? Cancer.

Aching knee? Cancer.

Overly tired? Probably cancer.

To be fair, there was a time when I did have the ‘big C’ but that was long ago, caught early and I‘ve been all clear for over 20 years.

However when I saw a groove appear in my head – literally in the top of the skull – I feared the worst.

Consulting Dr Google didn’t help, with diagnosis ranging from my skull caving in to the cliched impending brain tumour.

Just as I was about to start planning my goodbyes, Jill looks at me and says, “You know it’s from your glasses when you rest them on top of your head when you’re reading” … and suddenly life is full of colour and optimism and our life insurance doesn’t get cancelled.

So as bad as your Monday may feel, be grateful you don’t have to work with me and my moronic self diagnosis.

Of course, if you read this and you do work with me, then I have no sympathy for you.